Is O.J. Simpson the Victim of Brain Damage?

Study Indicates Higher Rate of Dementia in Former N.F.L. Players – NYTimes.com

One of the first things I thought upon seeing this is, oh shit, OJ probably went crazy from too many concussions. People often forget the obvious fact that murder isn’t something done by mentally healthy people. Sure, if you go to jail, you are legally sane, which is to say sane enough to know what you did is wrong, but almost always there is a pathology at the headwaters of the deed. I can’t help but wonder if a tackle too many knocked something loose upstairs.

The Simpsons

On the episode that talks about when Homer was in the Bee Sharps, I could have sworn that he said to Bart, “What did I say about swearing like a 19th century shoe black?” or something along those lines. But when I saw it just now, he said “What did I say about swearing like a grizzled 1890′s prospector?” and it even looked like the part didn’t lip sync correctly (though in those earlier episodes, the lip syncing wasn’t exactly perfect). Am I witnessing an easter egg?

Hmm…

Analogy Machine Example #2

With infinite possibilities, seemingly bothersome restrictions may not make any difference.. it may even demoralize to loosen restrictions or “burn family pictures to keep the house warm” when one could deem them absolutely inflammable and magically manage to find other fuel.

In episode 7, season 12 of South Park “Super Fun Time”, we see Butters adamantly refusing to let go of Cartman’s hand (it violates his very nature to break rules!) and the cast of the historic reenactment village adamantly refusing to break character. Despite refusing to budge on these seemingly petty issues, they triumphed anyway. Is the notion that restrictions could make the otherwise possible impossible may be very unlikely.

Here’s the real world scenario – torture

Forgetting for a second the heinousness of using torture, is adding it as an alternative likely to make impossible things possible? Will some disaster occur that could have been averted if only we allowed torture? Unlikely, though the uncreative mind would disagree. Notice that Cartman and Butters don’t even mention the possibility of letting go to get on the truck but go with the more elaborate swinging around. Cartman plays along with Butters’ more, just as Stan reluctantly does with that of the reenactors.

Imagine the hollow victory that would have been won if the cast broke their years-long (hey, they had a reputation that even the 911 operator knew of!) vow of in-character in this circumstance. It would then be excusable in any number of circumstances to break character. How sad that would be.